Globularia cordifolia L.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Globularia cordifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/globularia/globularia-cordifolia/). Accessed 2020-01-23.

Genus

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    crenulate
    With small rounded teeth at the edge.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.
    prostrate
    Lying flat.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Globularia cordifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/globularia/globularia-cordifolia/). Accessed 2020-01-23.

    An evergreen prostrate shrub forming tufts or mats 2 to 4 in. high, the root-stock and lower parts woody; young shoots glabrous, purplish, often creeping. Leaves alternate, wedge-shaped, once or twice notched at the broad rounded apex, tapered gradually to the base, 34 to 112 in. long (including the long, slender stalk), 18 to 38 in. wide, margins towards the apex often wavy or faintly crenulate. Flowers blue, closely packed in a hemispherical head 12 to 34 in. wide, borne at the top of an erect glabrous stalk 112 to 4 in. high. Corolla two- lipped, the upper lip two-lipped, the lower one three-lobed, all the lobes linear. Calyx five-lobed, hairy, the lobes awl-shaped. Stamens four, conspicuously exposed.

    Native of the Alps, Tyrol, and mountains of S. Europe, usually in rocky places and in limestone districts; cultivated in England in 1633, according to Aiton. It flowers in July and August and is worth a place in the rock garden for its neat close habit and its pretty heads of blue flowers with prominently outstanding stamens. Increased by division or by cuttings.


    Feedback

    A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

    For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

    To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.