Genista ephedroides DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Genista ephedroides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/genista/genista-ephedroides/). Accessed 2020-02-22.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
linear
Strap-shaped.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Genista ephedroides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/genista/genista-ephedroides/). Accessed 2020-02-22.

A deciduous shrub of erect habit, much branched, up to 3 or 4 ft high, young shoots very slender, finely grooved, downy at first. Leaves very sparse; each made up of three linear leaflets 14 in. long, soon dropping, those towards the end of the shoot simple, grey, downy. Flowers yellow, solitary, fragrant, borne alternately on the shoot mostly towards the top, 38 in. long; they are of the ordinary broom-flower shape. The calyx has two large triangular teeth and three small ones. Pods 14 to 13 in. long, oval, ending in a curved beak, downy, carrying one to three seeds. Seeds black, shining. Flowers in May and June.

Native of Sardinia, Corsica, and Sicily, often near the sea coast. It bears some resemblance to Ephedra distachya in habit and this suggested the specific name. It appears to be nearest to G. radiata, but that species has its flowers in a terminal head. It is one of a fair number of brooms that have practically no foliage, the normal functions of which are performed by the green stems. It is a rather tender shrub and needs a sunny, sheltered nook. It is allied to G. aetnensis but differs in its smaller stature and its trifoliolate, not simple, leaves.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

Another point of distinction between this species and G. aetnensis is that the calyx is coated with silky hairs (in G. aetnensis it is almost glabrous).

Corsica was mentioned as part of the range of this species, but it is possible that the broom appearing under this name in works on the Corsican flora is really G. linifolia L., a species not treated in this work.


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