Gaylussacia frondosa (L.) Torr. & Gr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaylussacia frondosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaylussacia/gaylussacia-frondosa/). Accessed 2020-01-23.

Genus

Common Names

  • Dangleberry

Synonyms

  • Vaccinium frondosum L.
  • V. venustum Ait.

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
divergent
Spreading from the centre.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lax
Loose or open.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaylussacia frondosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaylussacia/gaylussacia-frondosa/). Accessed 2020-01-23.

A deciduous shrub 3 to 6 ft high, with slender, divergent branches; young wood glabrous or nearly so. Leaves obovate or oval, rounded or notched at the apex, 1 to 212 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide, bright green and glabrous above, rather glaucous, downy, and sprinkled with resin-dots beneath. Flowers produced in June and July on loose, slender racemes 112 to 3 in. long, each flower on a threadlike, pendulous stalk 13 to 1 in. long. Corolla roundish bell-shaped, scarcely 15 in. long, purplish green; calyx-lobes glabrous, triangular. Fruits blue, 13 in. or more wide, globose, glabrous, very palatable.

Native of the eastern United States; introduced in 1761. This is one of the handsomest of the gaylussacias, and is distinct in the long-stalked flowers and lax racemes, and the bluntish leaves. The popular name refers to the loosely hanging fruits; they are not freely developed in this country.


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