Gaylussacia baccata (Wangenh.) K. Koch

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaylussacia baccata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaylussacia/gaylussacia-baccata/). Accessed 2020-04-02.

Genus

Common Names

  • Black Huckleberry

Synonyms

  • Andromeda baccata Wangenh.
  • G. resinosa (Ait.) Torr. & Gr.

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
viscid
Sticky.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaylussacia baccata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaylussacia/gaylussacia-baccata/). Accessed 2020-04-02.

A deciduous, much-branched shrub 1 to 3 ft high, the young wood minutely downy and viscid. Leaves obovate or oval, mostly bluntish at the apex, 1 to 214 in. long, 12 to 34 in. wide, deep green above, paler yellowish beneath with resin-dots on both surfaces. Flowers produced in May in drooping racemes 1 in. or less long, carrying six to eight flowers, each on a thin stalk 18 to 14 in. long. Corolla conical, 15 in. long, narrowed towards the mouth, dull red. Fruits 14 to 13 in. diameter, globose, shining black, without bloom.

Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1772. In the United States it is considered the best of the huckleberries for eating, although said to vary very much in quality in different localities. It is distinguishable from the other deciduous huckleberries by the abundant resinous secretion on twig, leaf, flower-stalk, etc., in combination with the short, dense racemes and glabrous fruits.


f. glaucocarpa (Robins.) Mackenzie

Fruits glaucous.

f. leucocarpa (Porter) Fern

Fruits whitish.

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