Gaultheria tetramera W. W. Sm.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaultheria tetramera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaultheria/gaultheria-tetramera/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
cuneate
Wedge-shaped.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
revolute
Rolled downwards at margin.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaultheria tetramera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaultheria/gaultheria-tetramera/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

An evergreen shrub 2 ft and upwards high, usually more in width; young shoots bristly. Leaves leathery, obovate to oblanceolate and roundish, 1 to 2 in. long, about half as wide, rounded to pointed at the apex, rounded to cuneate at the base, shallowly toothed, glabrous above, sparsely bristly below; stalk short. Flowers fragrant, crowded in axillary racemes about i in. long; corolla greenish white, ovoid, nearly closed at the mouth where are four or five tiny revolute lobes. Fruits brilliant violet-blue or china blue, globose, 14 in. wide. Bot. Mag., t. 9618.

Native of S.W. China, discovered and collected several times by Forrest in 1912, in one instance at 13,000 ft altitude. It should, therefore, be fairly hardy but will, no doubt, succeed best in the south and west. I have for instance seen it very attractively in fruit at Exbury on the Solent.

G. tetramera was given an Award of Merit when shown by Messrs Hillier at Vincent Square in September 1950. For a note on this species by the late Francis Hanger see Journ. R.H.S., Vol. 68, p. 109.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

G. semi-infera – The introduction of this species from eastern Nepal in 1971, briefly mentioned in later printings, was by the University of North Wales Expedition under B.L. & M. 249 and 320. It is also in cultivation from Schilling 2503.


G semi-infera (C. B. Clarke) Airy Shaw

Synonyms
Diplycosia semi-infera C . B, Clarke

This species is closely allied to G. tetramera but differs consistently from it and from all other members of the section Leucothoïdes in having only five stamens to the flower instead of the usual ten. Other characters distinguishing it from G. tetramera are its taller stature (to about 6 ft high) and the more or less elliptic leaves. Native of the region from the Sikkim Himalaya eastward through N. Burma to S.W. China. It was given an Award of Merit when shown by N. G. Hadden of West Porlock, Somerset, in September 1950, and the figure in Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 197, is made from his plant.The date of introduction of G. semi-infera is uncertain, but Forrest probably sent seeds on more than one occasion and it was reintroduced from Bhutan in 1949.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.