Gaultheria oppositifolia Hook. f.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaultheria oppositifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaultheria/gaultheria-oppositifolia/). Accessed 2020-12-02.

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
truncate
Appearing as if cut off.
whorl
Arrangement of three or more organs (leaves flowers) around a central axis. whorled Arranged in a whorl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Gaultheria oppositifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/gaultheria/gaultheria-oppositifolia/). Accessed 2020-12-02.

A very leafy evergreen shrub of sturdy, bushy, much-branched habit, up to 8 ft high in the wild; young shoots mostly glabrous, but with scattered bristles sometimes. Leaves thick, opposite, stalkless, ovate-oblong to ovate, heart-shaped to somewhat truncate at the base, toothed, the base often overlapping the stem, 1 to 2 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, dark glossy green and glabrous above, pale, strongly net-veined and occasionally with scattered bristles beneath. Flowers borne very numerously in terminal panicles as much as 4 in. wide and long; flower-stalks glabrous. Corolla bell-shaped, white, about 16 in. long; calyx-lobes narrow triangular, glabrous, dry, and never apparently becoming fleshy and enlarged, as is usual in this genus.

Native of New Zealand in the mountains of the North Island up to 3,000 ft. It flowers with us in May and June. The species is very distinct among cultivated gaultherias in its opposite leaves, though at the upper part of the branches towards the flower-panicle there are sometimes three in a whorl. It is the most ornamental of the gaultherias in New Zealand in regard to its flowers and comparable in this respect with the better Chinese and Himalayan species. Although generally considered to be tender, it has grown in the Heath Garden at Wakehurst Place, Sussex, for over forty years.

G. fagifolia Hook. f. is near the above, having its white flowers in racemes up to 2 in. long. The leaves, however, are alternate and usually 12 to 1 in. long. The calyx-lobes do not enlarge nor become succulent. New Zealand. It is a hybrid between G. oppositifolia and G. antipoda. Hooker described this gaultheria from specimens collected by Colenso at Motukino, near Lake Taupa. In other forms of the cross, fruits with the succulent calyces of G. antipoda and the dry ones of G. oppositifolia are found on the same plant.