Fraxinus sogdiana Bunge

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fraxinus sogdiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fraxinus/fraxinus-sogdiana/). Accessed 2020-01-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • F. potamophila Herder
  • F. regelii Dipp.

Glossary

herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fraxinus sogdiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fraxinus/fraxinus-sogdiana/). Accessed 2020-01-28.

A small tree up to 30 or 35 ft high, with green shoots, free from down in all its parts. Leaves 4 to 12 in. long; leaflets stalked, usually nine or eleven, sometimes seven or thirteen, 1 to 3 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, tapered at the base, triangular toothed, pointed, dull green; rachis whitish beneath, with a broad, shallow groove above; stalks of the leaflets 14 to 12_in. long, except the terminal one, which is 34 to 1 in. long. Flowers as in the common ash and its allies. Fruits narrow-lanceolate, 114 to 2 in. long.

Native of Turkestan and other parts of W. Asia; introduced to Kew by way of the St Petersburg Botanic Garden in 1891. It is an elegant small tree, very rare in cultivation, but quite distinct among ashes with the same number of leaflets in these being conspicuously stalked, and, together with the young shoots, quite glabrous. The true species is not at present in the Kew collection (1971).

F. sogdiana varies in the size and shape of its leaflets. The plants called F. potamophila have the leaflets relatively broader than in F. sogdiana in the strict sense, but judging from material in the Kew Herbarium only one species is involved and F. potamophila is accordingly placed under F. sogdiana in synonymy, as it is in Flora SSSR.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.