Fortunearia sinensis Rehd. & Wils.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fortunearia sinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fortunearia/fortunearia-sinensis/). Accessed 2020-07-15.

Genus

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    bisexual
    See hermaphrodite.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    midrib
    midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
    monoecious
    With male and female flowers on the same plant.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Fortunearia sinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fortunearia/fortunearia-sinensis/). Accessed 2020-07-15.

    A monoecious, deciduous shrub of strong spreading growth, ultimately 20 to 25 ft high; young shoots, leaf-stalks and flower-stalks covered with starry down. Leaves obovate, tapered more abruptly towards the apex than the often rounded or slightly heart-shaped base, unevenly toothed, 3 to 6 in. long, about half as much wide, dullish green and glabrous above, downy on the midrib and veins beneath; stalk 18 to 13 in. long. Flowers green, borne in terminal racemes either entirely male or entirely bisexual; the former are catkin-like, up to 34 in. long, with the small flowers very densely packed; the latter are 1 to 2 in. long with flowers 16 in. across. Capsules 12 in. long.

    Native of W. China; discovered and introduced by Wilson to the Arnold Arboretum in 1907, thence to Kew in 1910, where it is very hardy and vigorous. Apart from its botanical interest there is little to recommend it. The flowers, which at Kew appear in February, are inconspicuous, and as regards foliage it has about the same ornamental value as the hazel.


    Feedback

    A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

    For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

    To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.