Forsythia europaea Deg. & Bald.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Forsythia europaea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/forsythia/forsythia-europaea/). Accessed 2020-08-09.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
relict species
Species that has survived unchanged from a previous age (a ‘living fossil’) or become geographically isolated from related species due to a change in circumstances.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Forsythia europaea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/forsythia/forsythia-europaea/). Accessed 2020-08-09.

A deciduous shrub of erect habit from 3 to 10 ft high; young wood not downy, but dotted with lenticels; pith lamellate. Leaves ovate, 2 to 3 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, of firm texture, glabrous, sometimes sharply and unequally toothed, but usually entire, pointed at the apex, rounded at the base; stalk 16 to 13 in. long. Flowers yellow, produced in March, mostly singly, occasionally in pairs. Calyx-lobes broadly ovate, green, shorter than the corolla-tube. Corolla 114in. wide, with four narrow-oblong divisions. Fruits smooth, ovoid, with a long beak. Bot. Mag., t. 8039.

A very rare relict species, confined to a small area in northern Albania and bordering parts of Yugoslavia; discovered by Dr Baldacci in 1897 and introduced by him to this country by means of seeds sent to Kew in 1899. Some doubt has been expressed as to its being truly native in Europe, as its fellow species are found only in the Far East; but from the wild nature of the country in which it is found, and the fact that several cases of analogous distribution in other genera exist, this doubt is not justified. It is allied to F. viridlssima, but differs in the ovate leaves and by a lanky habit which makes it more ungainly. It is the least ornamental of forsythias and the last to flower, but is of phytogeographical interest.

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