Forestiera neo-mexicana A. Gray

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Forestiera neo-mexicana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/forestiera/forestiera-neo-mexicana/). Accessed 2020-01-26.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Adelia neo-mexicana (A. Gray) O. Kuntze

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
unisexual
Having only male or female organs in a flower.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Forestiera neo-mexicana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/forestiera/forestiera-neo-mexicana/). Accessed 2020-01-26.

A deciduous shrub 6 to 9 ft high, of spreading habit; young shoots glabrous. Leaves opposite, obovate, oval, or oblanceolate, faintly toothed or entire, mostly rounded or bluntish at the apex, tapered at the base; 12 to 134 in. long, 14 to 1 in. wide, quite glabrous; stalk 18 to 14 in long. Flowers unisexual, clustered at the joints, small and inconspicuous. Fruits black, covered with blue bloom, egg-shaped, scarcely 14 in. long, each on a slender stalk 18 to 14 in long.

Native of the S.W. United States; introduced to Kew in 1925, but known to American botanists long before. F. acuminata is easily distinguished from F. neo-mexicana by its slenderly pointed, longer leaves and larger cylindrical fruits. The latter species is quite hardy and grows well in this country, but its chief attraction is in the fruits, for whose copious development our climate probably is not sunny enough.


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