Fontanesia fortunei Carr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fontanesia fortunei' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fontanesia/fontanesia-fortunei/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

Genus

Synonyms

  • F. phillyreoides var. sinensis Debeaux

Other species in genus

Glossary

herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fontanesia fortunei' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fontanesia/fontanesia-fortunei/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

A deciduous shrub 10 to 15 ft high in gardens, but said to become a tree 30 to 40 ft high in China; young branchlets angular, glabrous. Leaves lanceolate, long-pointed, 1 to 412 in. long, 13 to 1 in. wide, entire, bright green, and quite glabrous. Flowers greenish white, produced in terminal, slender panicles 1 to 2 in. long, and in axillary shorter ones; each flower 16 in. long. Fruit a flat oblong disk, 38 in. long, with winged margins, notched at the apex.

Native of China; found by Fortune in 1845, and later by several other collectors, near Shanghai. It is very closely allied to the following better known species from Asia Minor; some authors consider it to be merely a variety of this. The most obvious distinctions are the larger more uniformly lance-shaped leaves (often oval or oblong in the other), and the more slender, elongated panicles. In a note by Commander W. Perry preserved in the Kew Herbarium, it is stated that the Chinese make fences round their compounds with branches of this tree interlaced. These take root and form a graceful hedge.


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