Fallugia paradoxa (D. Don) Endl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fallugia paradoxa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fallugia/fallugia-paradoxa/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Sieversia paradoxa D. Don

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    carpel
    Female reproductive organ of a flower. Composed of ovary style and stigma. Typically several carpels are fused together in each flower (syncarpous). The number of them can be of taxonomic significance; it can often be assessed by counting the stigma branches or the chambers in the fruit.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    raceme
    Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
    style
    Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Fallugia paradoxa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fallugia/fallugia-paradoxa/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

    A slender deciduous shrub 4 to 8 ft high, much branched below, more thinly above; branchlets white, covered with down. Leaves produced in clusters closely and alternately along the twigs, 12 to 23 in. long, 13 in. wide, cut usually into three or five (occasionally seven) narrow-linear lobes, recurved at the edges and 112 in. wide, dark green above, paler below, and covered all over with pale down. Flowers produced either singly or a few together on a raceme 114 to 4 in. long, from the end of the shoot or from the leaf-axis near the end. Each flower is 1 to 114 in. across, petals white; calyx 14 in. diameter, downy, with five ovate, pointed lobes; and five small bracts alternating with them. The heads of fruits are very handsome, each carpel being terminated by a slender style 1 in. to 112 in. long, clothed with silky hairs, the whole forming a dense feathery mass, 112 in. across. Flowers in July. Bot. Mag., t. 6660.

    Native of S.E. California, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada; introduced in 1877. This interesting and beautiful shrub is very rare in cultivation, and likely to remain so. Coming from the dry, sun-baked hills of the south-western United States, it finds in the English climate conditions almost the opposite of its native surroundings. It would probably be best suited on a warm slope in the drier parts of England. Elsewhere it will thrive best in well-drained soil at the base of a sunny wall.


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