Cytisus × dallimorei Rolfe

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cytisus × dallimorei' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cytisus/cytisus-x-dallimorei/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

Genus

Synonyms

  • × Cytothamnus dallimorei (Rolfe) Schneid.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
internode
Section of stem between two nodes.
orbicular
Circular.
standard petal
(in the flowers of some legumes) Large upper petal; also known as ‘vexillum’.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cytisus × dallimorei' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cytisus/cytisus-x-dallimorei/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

A hybrid raised at Kew in 1900 by crossing C. scoparius ‘Andreanus’ (seed-bearer) with C. multiflorus. It is a tall shrub, perhaps 8 or 9 ft high, of thin, erect habit, suggesting that of C. scoparius; young wood ribbed. Leaves mostly trifoliolate, downy. Flowers about 58 in. long, the whole of the petals suffused with beautiful shades of rosy pink deepening on the wing petals to crimson; the almost orbicular standard petal is 58 in. long, darker outside than within, keel almost white. Calyx helmet-shaped, shining brown, slightly downy, 18 in. long; flower-stalk 14 in. long, downy. At each node the flowers are solitary or in pairs. Bot. Mag., t. 8482.

This beautiful broom is quite distinct from any other in cultivation, and is the first hybrid broom raised by artificial cross-fertilisation, all its predecessors having originated as chance crosses made by insects. It is propagated by grafting on laburnum or by cuttings. The original hybrid (which should really be distinguished as C. × dallimorei ‘William Dallimore’) is less common now in gardens than formerly but still well worth growing for its beautiful flowers and for its historic interest as one of the parents of the modern race of garden brooms.


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