Crataegus spathulata Michx.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Crataegus spathulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-spathulata/). Accessed 2020-04-09.

Genus

Synonyms

  • C. microcarpa Lindl.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Crataegus spathulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-spathulata/). Accessed 2020-04-09.

A shrub or small tree, with a slender trunk and spreading branches; young shoots glabrous or soon becoming so, and reddish brown; thorns either absent or few. Leaves spoon-shaped, diamond-shaped, or obovate; often very distinctly three-lobed, the lobes coarsely round-toothed; apex blunt, the base narrowing to a long thin strip each side of the stalk; often with scattered down on both surfaces when young; the stalk, although apparently long, is really very short, owing to the extension of the blade in a narrow wing down each side. Excluding this, the leaves of the flowering shoots are 12 to 1 in. long, 38 to 58 in. wide; on the barren shoots 1 to 112 in. long, nearly as much wide. Flowers white, 12 in. diameter, produced towards the end of June in corymbs 112 in. across; stamens sixteen to twenty; styles two to five. Fruit 316 in. in diameter, globose, coral-red.

Native of the south and south-eastern United States; introduced in 1806. It ripens its fruits late, not until October, and both they and the leaves remain on the plant until the New Year. This is one of the more tender thorns, and apt to suffer in severe winters. Distinct in its tiny fruits.


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