Crataegus oliveriana [Dum.-Cours.] Bosc

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Crataegus oliveriana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-oliveriana/). Accessed 2020-07-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Mespilus oliveriana Dum.-Cours.
  • C. oxyacantha var. oliveriana (Bosc) Lindl.
  • C. pentagyna var. oliveriana (Dum.-Cours.) Rehd.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
synonym
(syn.) (botanical) An alternative or former name for a taxon usually considered to be invalid (often given in brackets). Synonyms arise when a taxon has been described more than once (the prior name usually being the one accepted as correct) or if an article of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature has been contravened requiring the publishing of a new name. Developments in taxonomic thought may be reflected in an increasing list of synonyms as generic or specific concepts change over time.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Crataegus oliveriana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-oliveriana/). Accessed 2020-07-05.

A shapely small tree with the habit of the common hawthorn, but not so tall; young shoots grey, downy. Leaves 1 to 2 in. long, often as wide; three- or five-lobed, the basal lobes deep; grey with down on both sides, especially beneath, remaining downy until they fall, even on the upper side; stalks 12 to 114 in. long. Flowers white, 58 in. across, in compact corymbs about 2 in. across. Calyx and flower-stalk very woolly. Fruits about 14 in. long, egg-shaped, black-purple, at first hairy, abundant.

Native of S.E. Europe. This rather striking thorn has by some authors been placed under C. pentagyna, to which it is, no doubt, closely allied. But, as represented at Kew, it differs plainly from it in the small fruits, in the deeper, more finely toothed lobes of the leaf, in the abundant and more persistent down, and in the entire or less deeply toothed stipules. It is, I think, undoubtedly the thorn mentioned by Loudon under the second synonym given above and figured by Lindley in Bot. Reg., t. 1933.


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