Crataegus jozana C.K. Schneid.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Crataegus jozana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-jozana/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Crataegus jozana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-jozana/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

Small tree to about 8 m, dbh ~0.2 m. Branchlets stout, dark purplish brown and tomentose-pubescent; thorns straight, 0.7–1.5 cm long. Buds 0.6–0.9 cm long, bud scales shiny, chestnut-coloured. Leaves deciduous, 6–12 × 3.5–10 cm, roughly ovate-elliptical, upper surface pubescent, lower surface tomentose, four to nine secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margin with four to seven (to nine) triangular lobes on each side of the midrib, lobe margins serrate, apex acute; petiole 1.3–5.5 cm long, pubescent; stipules conspicuous, 1.7–2.3 cm long, ovate to lanceolate with serrate margins. Inflorescence corymbose, tomentose, ~6 cm diameter with numerous flowers. Flowers white, ~1.5 cm diameter; sepals white-tomentose, triangular and slightly glandular, petals circular, stamens 20 with pale pink anthers. Fruit ~1 cm diameter, globose, black with conspicuous reflexed sepals at the crown, seeds five. Flowering June, fruiting October (Japan). Miyabe & Kudo 1986. Distribution JAPAN: Hokkaido; RUSSIAN FEDERATION: Sakhalin. Habitat Deciduous, broadleaved forest, between 0 and 300 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 3–4. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration Miyabe & Kudo 1986. Taxonomic note Crataegus jozana is closely related to C. chlorosarca but differs in being glabrous (Phipps et al. 2003).

Crataegus jozana is scarce in cultivation outside Japan, but grows in a handful of collections ranging from the Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, Canada, to the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh and Rogów Arboretum in Poland, giving the impression that it must be very hardy. Unfortunately no specimens have been observed for the current work but it can be expected to have similar qualities to C. chlorosarca, and with its large leaves and black fruit, could be rather attractive.


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