Crataegus azarolus l.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Crataegus azarolus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-azarolus/). Accessed 2020-04-09.

Genus

Synonyms

  • C. aronia Bosc

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Crataegus azarolus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/crataegus/crataegus-azarolus/). Accessed 2020-04-09.

A small, very slightly spiny tree up to 30 ft high; young shoots covered with fine down. Leaves wedge-shaped at the base, 112 to 3 in. long, nearly as wide; obovate to rhomboidal, three- or five-lobed (sometimes almost to the midrib), lobes toothed at the end or sometimes entire; bright green, ultimately nearly glabrous above, downy beneath; stalk 12 to 1 in. long; stipules deeply toothed, cockscomb-shaped. Flowers white, about 12 in. across, produced during June in densely flowered corymbs 2 to 3 in. across; stamens twenty; style one or two (rarely three). Fruit up to 34 or 1 in. diameter, globose, mostly orange or yellow, but varying to whitish or red, apple-like in flavour.

Native of S. Europe, N. Africa and the Near East; cultivated in England in the seventeenth century, but never, I think, very common – most of the trees so-called being either the var. sinaica or C. laciniata. The latter is different in general aspect, its leaves are thinner, and with narrower, deeper lobing as a rule, and the flowers have from three to five styles. The species is cultivated in S.E. Europe for its edible fruits, which vary much in size and colour.


var. sinaica (Boiss.) Lange

Synonyms
C. sinaica Boiss.
C. maroccana Lindl

Leaves quite glabrous; fruit yellow or yellowish red. Native of the Near East; introduced in 1822. There is a specimen about 20 ft high in the Royal Victoria Park, Bath.

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