Cotoneaster rubens W. W. Sm.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cotoneaster rubens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cotoneaster/cotoneaster-rubens/). Accessed 2020-02-29.

Genus

Glossary

Tibet
Traditional English name for the formerly independent state known to its people as Bod now the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The name Xizang is used in lists of Chinese provinces.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
orbicular
Circular.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cotoneaster rubens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cotoneaster/cotoneaster-rubens/). Accessed 2020-02-29.

A deciduous shrub 2 to 4 ft high, of stout, flattish, spreading habit, irregularly branched; young shoots downy. Leaves roundish to broadly oval, 12 to 1 in. long, thinly hairy above at first, covered with pale yellowish wool beneath, obscurely mucronate; stalk scarcely discernible. Flowers solitary, almost stalkless, terminating short shoots, 38 in. wide, described by Forrest as ‘red’; petals orbicular, 16 in. wide; calyx ovoid, appressed-downy; sepals ciliate; ovary densely woolly.

Native of Yunnan, China, discovered by Forrest in 1915. The late Mrs Gwendolen Anley, of Woking, showed a plant at Vincent Square in January 1935.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This species, originally discovered in Yunnan, ranges through northern Burma and south-east Tibet to Bhutan. Dr Brian Mulligan tells us it is in cultivation at the Washington University Arboretum, Seattle, from seeds collected by Ludlow and Sherriff in Bhutan in 1949.


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