Cotoneaster acuminatus Lindl.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cotoneaster acuminatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cotoneaster/cotoneaster-acuminatus/). Accessed 2020-02-25.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cotoneaster acuminatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cotoneaster/cotoneaster-acuminatus/). Accessed 2020-02-25.

A deciduous shrub 10 to 14 ft high, of erect habit; young shoots thickly covered with a pale brown wool. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, 1 to 2 in. long, about half as wide, long-pointed, dark green and silky-hairy above when young, paler and more hairy beneath; stalk 14 in. or less long. Flowers more or less pink, 38 in. across, produced in small clusters of rarely more than five, often of two or three, on short leafy twigs. Fruit red, 13 in. long, oblong, thickening towards the top; downy near the apex; nutlets two.

Native of the Himalaya, up to 12,000 ft; first raised in this country by Loddiges of Hackney in 1820. The species, which is not much grown in gardens now, is allied to C. simonsii, but differs in its much larger, longer-pointed leaves. According to Brandis it often occurs as underwood in oak forests.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.