Coronilla emeroides Boiss.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Coronilla emeroides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/coronilla/coronilla-emeroides/). Accessed 2020-09-22.

Genus

Glossary

appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
umbel
Inflorescence in which pedicels all arise from same point on peduncle. May be flat-topped (as in e.g. Umbelliferae) to spherical (as in e.g. Araliaceae). umbellate In form of umbel.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Coronilla emeroides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/coronilla/coronilla-emeroides/). Accessed 2020-09-22.

A deciduous shrub 4 or 5 ft high, with angled branches. Leaves in two opposite rows, pinnate, composed usually of seven leaflets; leaflets obovate, 14 to 34 in. long, with a few appressed hairs or quite glabrous. Flowers borne in an umbel at the end of a stalk 2 to 3 in. long, with from four to eight (more often five) flowers in the umbel; each flower 12 to 34 in. long. Petals yellow, with a long claw; calyx 18 in. long, cup-shaped. Pod 2 to 3 in. long, slender, round and jointed, each segment containing one seed.

Native of Greece, Crete, and other parts of S. E. Europe, also Syria. It is nearly allied and very similar to the well-known C. emerus, in habit, leaf, colour and shape of flower. But it is distinguished by having seven instead of nine as the usual number of leaflets, by its longer-stalked umbels, and by the more numerous flowers in each. It commences to flower in May or June, and continues for several months.

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