Cornus macrophylla Wall.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cornus macrophylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cornus/cornus-macrophylla/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Genus

Synonyms

  • C. brachypoda C. A. Mey.
  • Swida macrophylla (Wall.) Sojak

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cornus macrophylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cornus/cornus-macrophylla/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

A deciduous tree 30 to 50 ft high; young shoots glabrous or nearly so. Leaves opposite, ovate to roundish or oblong, the base rounded or tapering, the apex with a slender, often tail-like point; 4 to 7 in. long, 2 to 312 in. wide; bright green, and soon becoming glabrous above; glaucous beneath, and at first clothed with pale, flattened, minute hairs attached at their middle; veins in six to eight pairs; stalks 12 to 114 in. long. Flowers yellowish white, numerous, produced in terminal, somewhat rounded cymes 4 to 6 in. across; each flower 12 in. diameter; petals oblong; calyx minutely toothed, grey with minute down. Fruit globose, 14 in. diameter, blue when ripe. Blossoms during July and August. Bot. Mag., t. 8261.

Native of the Himalaya, whence it was introduced in 1827, China, and Japan. It is a handsome and striking small tree, chiefly noteworthy for its fine foliage; the flowers, although profusely borne, are of too dull a white to be very effective. There was a tree approaching 40 ft in height in Coombe Wood nursery. Much confusion has existed between this species and C. controversa (q.v.).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

There is a good specimen of this species at Kew near King William’s Temple. It came from Japan in 1910 and is about 40 ft high.

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