Clematis serratifolia Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Clematis serratifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/clematis/clematis-serratifolia/). Accessed 2020-08-13.

Genus

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Clematis serratifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/clematis/clematis-serratifolia/). Accessed 2020-08-13.

A deciduous climber, growing 10 ft high, with slender, glabrous, ribbed stems. Leaves doubly ternate, the leaflets ovate to lanceolate, 112 to 3 in. long, often oblique at the base, pointed, sharply toothed; thin in texture, quite glabrous, bright green; stalks 12 to 1 in. long. Flowers produced singly, in pairs, or in threes from the leaf-axils in August and September. Sepals four, lanceolate or narrowly oblong, pointed, about 1 in. long, 14 in. wide, soft yellow, downy inside and at the margins; stamens purple; seed-vessels with feathery styles 2 in. long.

Native of Korea; introduced about 1918. It is closely allied to C. tangutica but that species differs in its pinnate or doubly pinnate leaves. The flowers of C. serratifolia are smaller but borne more plentifully. An attractive addition to the clematises with yellow flowers.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This species, a member of the C. orientalis alliance, was introduced from Korea but also occurs in bordering parts of Russia and China.

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