Clematis connata DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Clematis connata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/clematis/clematis-connata/). Accessed 2020-04-09.

Genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Clematis connata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/clematis/clematis-connata/). Accessed 2020-04-09.

A deciduous climber of vigorous habit, growing 20 ft or more high; stems only slightly ribbed, not downy. Leaves mostly consisting of three or five leaflets, which are bright green on both sides, sometimes three-lobed, but in the main ovate, with a heart-shaped base, and a long, fine point, coarsely toothed, 2 to 5 in. long, 1 to 3 in. wide, either glabrous or downy. The bases of the common stalks of each pair of leaves are flat, thin, and broad, and surround the stem. Flowers bell-shaped, slightly fragrant, produced in September and October in axillary panicles 4 or 5 in. long. Sepals soft yellow, oblong, 34 to 1 in. long, pointed with the points turned back, finely downy inside. Seed-vessel surmounted by silky plumose styles, 1 to 114 in. long.

Native of the Himalaya up to 10,000 ft. It bears some resemblance to C. rehderiana, but its leaves are not silky, and are especially distinguished by the broad, flattened stalks at the base; the sepals, too, are not so distinctly ribbed. The flower is rather larger and not so fragrant. It is quite hardy at Kew in the open ground. The species varies considerably in the amount of down on the leaves and young stems, and in the size of the flattened expansions of the leaf-stalks.


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