Celtis reticulata Torr.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Celtis reticulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/celtis/celtis-reticulata/). Accessed 2020-01-26.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.
venation
Pattern of veins (nerves) especially in a leaf.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Celtis reticulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/celtis/celtis-reticulata/). Accessed 2020-01-26.

A small deciduous tree 30 to 40 ft high, sometimes shrubby; young shoots covered thickly with outstanding down. Leaves obliquely ovate, rounded or heart-shaped at the base, pointed, toothed except at the base, often entire on adult plants; 112 to 412 in. long, 1 to 3 in. wide; pale bright green, rough to the touch and with scarcely any down above; very downy on the midrib and veins, and conspicuously net-veined beneath; stalk 14 to 38 in. long. Fruit globose, 13 in. wide, orange-red, borne on a slender downy stalk 13 to 12 in. long.

Native of the S.W. United States (Texas, etc.); originally described in 1828. On young trees introduced from the Arnold Arboretum in 1920, the leaves are more downy and more conspicuously toothed than in adult fruit-bearing speci­mens collected in the wild; the latter have leaves toothed only near the apex or are quite toothless. The strong venation of the leaves is a prominent characteristic of this tree.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This is best regarded as a variety of C. occidentalis – var. reticulata (Torr.) Sarg. There are young plants at Kew.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.