Berberis heteropoda Schrenk

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis heteropoda' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-heteropoda/). Accessed 2020-01-17.

Genus

Other species in genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
stigma
(in a flower) The part of the carpel that receives pollen and on which it germinates. May be at the tip of a short or long style or may be reduced to a stigmatic surface at the apex of the ovary.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.
umbel
Inflorescence in which pedicels all arise from same point on peduncle. May be flat-topped (as in e.g. Umbelliferae) to spherical (as in e.g. Araliaceae). umbellate In form of umbel.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis heteropoda' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-heteropoda/). Accessed 2020-01-17.

A deciduous shrub up to about 8 ft high, of loose, spreading habit; branchlets glossy, glabrous, brown, either armed with simple or three-parted spines 1 in. long, or unarmed. Leaves grey-green, broadly ovate or oval, rounded at the apex; the blade 1 to 112 in. long, tapering at the base to a long, slender, reddish stalk, 23 to 1 in. long; margin sometimes almost or quite entire, more often set with fine teeth. Inflorescences drooping, long-stalked, three of which often issue from one tuft of leaves; one being large, racemose, with as many as fifteen flowers, the other two smaller, umbellate, with about three flowers. Each flower is on a slender stalk, fragrant, orange-yellow, opening in May. Fruit oblong or egg-shaped, 13 in. long, black, covered with blue bloom.

Native of Turkestan; introduced to Kew in 1886 from the St Petersburg Botanic Garden through Albert Regel. It is distinct by reason of its long, slender leaf-stalks, and long, drooping, many-flowered racemes, often flanked on either side by a few-flowered umbel.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

Closely related to this species is B. oblonga (Reg.) Schneid. (B. heteropoda var. oblonga Reg.). The inflorescences bear more numerous flowers and the fruits have a short style (in B. heteropoda the stigma is sessile).


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