Berberis chillanensis (Schneid.) Sprague

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis chillanensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-chillanensis/). Accessed 2020-08-13.

Genus

Synonyms

  • B. montana var. chillanensis Schneid.

Other species in genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis chillanensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-chillanensis/). Accessed 2020-08-13.

A deciduous shrub 5 to 15 ft high; young shoots greyish or greyish brown, minutely downy or glabrous; spines simple, three-pronged or absent, 16 to 13 in. long. Leaves very shortly stalked, narrowly obovate, mostly blunt or rounded at the apex; 16 to 12 in. long, 112 to 15in. wide; quite entire. Flowers in fascicles, each 12 in. wide and borne on a stalk 15 to 25 in. long; sepals yellow, petals pale orange coloured; stamens about as long as the petals. Fruit lemon-shaped, 13 in. long, black, covered with purple bloom, the style prominently exposed at the end.

Native of the Chilean and Argentine Andes; discovered in the middle of the last century in the Cordillera of Chillan and first described by Schneider as a variety of B. montana, to which it is closely allied. Comber found it again in flower in January 1926, growing at 6,000 ft (415A), but the form he collected in seed grew at a lower altitude and was a taller plant, to 8 ft high (415). This differed from Schneider’s type in having downy flower-stalks and more densely downy stems, and was distinguished by Sprague as var. hirsutipes, which is thus the form in which the species is cultivated (Bot. Mag., t. 9503). It is rare in gardens and not quite so fine a species as B. montana, for the flowers are smaller and more palely coloured.

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