Berberis aggregata Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis aggregata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-aggregata/). Accessed 2020-04-02.

Genus

Synonyms

  • B. geraldii Veitch

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
cuneate
Wedge-shaped.
glaucescent
Becoming glaucous; (incorrectly) slightly glaucous.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis aggregata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-aggregata/). Accessed 2020-04-02.

A deciduous shrub 3 to 5 ft high; young shoots angular, minutely downy, armed with slender, three-pronged spines 13 to 1 in. long. Leaves clustered, obovate, 13 to 1 in. long, spiny-toothed (often only sparsely), the base cuneate, the apex rounded; rather glaucescent beneath. Flowers pale yellow, 14 in. across, densely packed in stalkless axillary panicles up to 112 in. long. Fruit roundish ovoid, nearly 14 in. long, red with a bloom. Bot. Mag., t. 8722.

Native of W. China, introduced by Wilson in 1908. It is an attractive species but has been largely displaced in gardens by its hybrid progeny (see B. × carminea and B. × rubrostilld). The seedling ‘Sibbertoft Coral’, with large clusters of bright red berries, is near to B. aggregata in its botanical characters.

For B. aggregata var. prattii and var. recurvata, see B. prattii.


B arido-callida Ahrendt

This allied species was introduced by Farrer from Kansu half a century ago, but has never become established in gardens.

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