Baccharis halimifolia L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Baccharis halimifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/baccharis/baccharis-halimifolia/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

Genus

Common Names

  • Bush Groundsel

Other species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
unisexual
Having only male or female organs in a flower.
viscid
Sticky.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Baccharis halimifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/baccharis/baccharis-halimifolia/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

A deciduous, unisexual shrub, ultimately 12 ft high, and as much in diameter; of somewhat loose habit; young branches angular, glabrous. Leaves grey-green, alternate, very variable in shape and size, broadly obovate to narrowly oval, coarsely and unevenly toothed, except those on the flowering portion of the shoot, which are entire; 1 to 3 in. long, 14 to 112 in. wide, tapering at the base to a stalk 18 to 14 in. long; both surfaces are freely sprinkled with resin dots, and rather viscid. Flower-heads produced in October in axillary, stalked clusters, about five in a cluster. The shoots of the year branch at the top into numerous short twigs furnished with untoothed leaves, from the axils of which the clusters of flower-heads are produced, so that the whole forms a large rounded or cylindrical leafy panicle 3 to 6 in. across. The blossom has little beauty, being of a dull white; but the numerous thistle-like heads of fruit of the female plant, with their silky white pappus, are rather striking.

Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1683, but not ornamental enough to have ever become widely cultivated. It is hardy at Kew, and is a useful shrub for coast situations.


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